Employee Resources

Resume Advice

Can’t think of anything to write down about what you do in your job? Answer some of these questions. We guarantee that you will come up with some new ideas about your job responsibilities and skills.

  • What experience, skills, aptitudes, or traits do you have, or think you might have, that could be of some use to some employer?
  • What skills have you developed, at least to some degree, that you have never used at work?
  • Do others at work or elsewhere, come to you for any particular kind of help? What kind?
  • Do you have military experience? Provide details such as branch, grade, specialty, discharge status, duties, accomplishments, medals, citations, or commendations.  Did you receive promotions ahead of schedule?
  • Have you ever published an article, report, or anything, even as a volunteer? How about a company or professional association newsletter?

The Interview – Things To Remember

  • People have to buy you before they buy from you.
  • People hire and accept emotionally first and justify logically later.
  • People are most sold by your conviction rather than by your persuasion.
  • Know your technology, but think PEOPLE.
  • The decision to hire is made in the first 5 to 10 minutes of the interview, with the remaining time spent justifying that decision.

Counteroffer Advice

It’s naive for executives to be surprised by counteroffers these days. In fields where talent is at a premium, the offers are a popular retention tactic. But why should a company wait until the eleventh hour to keep someone it claims to value so highly?  Obviously, the move is pure defensive. You may feel flattered, but don’t be fooled. A counteroffer isn’t about what’s best for you; it’s about what’s best for the company.

If you expect to receive an offer to stay with your firm, how should you deal with it? First, don’t allow a counteroffer discussion to occur.  Leaving the door open for discussion induces the company to invest time and resources into enticing you to stay.  This can make you feel guilty, which makes it more difficult to stick to your decision to leave, even though you know you should honor it.

Take an active part in your own career management. If your company is interested in your progression, you’ll know it before you decide to resign. If you change your mind and stay, your motives and methods will always be suspect. Keep a steady course and don’t look back.

Submit a courteous, positive and final resignation letter that leaves no room for discussion. By behaving honorably, you may have the option of re-employment with the company or to join a former boss elsewhere later on. You’ll also have the chance to start a promising new role with additional challenges, an expanded network, an untarnished reputation and a clear conscience.  Everybody wins.